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Jewish Webring

Manager: tamar_the_ringmistress
The Jewish Webring is a collection of tasteful sites pertaining to Judaism and the Jewish people. The idea is to reflect a positive view of ourselves and not stoop to the level of those that hate us.  Due to the sensitive nature of this ring, your site must be in a language that the ring manager can understand, which is either English or Hebrew.  Toda Raba!

 

 

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OY VEY! All this milkweed and NO MONARCHS! - 07/30/2013
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-quUhUR2u7do/UfcUsAurISI/AAAAAAAAAh4/gTBKxkt73Yg/s200/milkweed_field3.jpg

For the past 16 years I have been allowing Common Milkweed to naturalize on my land for the Monarchs butterflies. This is just one of several big patches that I maintain.  (I am now in the process of certifying my land as a Monarch Way Station through  Monarch Watch. ) Normally I could walk out there and within minutes find the whole life cycle of the Monarch butterflies.  This year: zero-zilch-nada.  I found only THREE EGGS, which I brought in to raise for my grandson to watch.  Only one hatched.  It is now a pupa.  The question is, when it emerges as a butterfly, will it be able to find a mate? As for adult butterflies, I've only seen one Monarch all summer.  Other species are scarce, too.   Normally this field would be teeming with all kinds of butterflies, as well as bees and other insects.  This year there are very few.   According to a March 18, 2013  article on the National Geographic News site,  this year has hit an all-time low for monarch populations. The most common butterflies on my land this summer seems to be the skippers and  fritillaries, but even those are few and far between.   I saw on the news that we have lost a whole generation of Monarchs down around Texas, due to bad weather.  Parts of the country were so cold this spring that there was no milkweed for the monarchs to breed on when they arrived.  Here we had rain every day for a month, followed by an unseasonal heat w...

OY VEY! All this milkweed and NO MONARCHS!



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